Mining the seams…

Strata:1 is a show that takes its name from the ‘collective’ of five Loughborough art school graduates – two from back in 2012 and three from the class of 2015.

IMG_0271How to be a painter in the second decade of this century should vex everyone who picks up a brush but loads of us keep doing it so what gives? Obviously we kick against the digital pricks and still get that visceral kick from something so obdurately analogue. These guys are definitely getting that idea in spades and well done for that. The seams maybe running thin but here are five younger artists determined to mine whatever ores are still running.

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Joshua Browitt

Joshua Browitt is digging in the far reaches of colourfield abstraction, out beyond the mid 80’s grunge of Larry Poons and the 90’s onwards of Jules Olitski. Though his canvasses are relatively small in size, making some of natural mushing of paint effects a tad uncomfortable and forced, they have the same gutsy feeling as their forbears and a curious muted colour palette that holds back some of the more lurid colour clashes of those antecedents.

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Martin Clarkson

Martin Clarkson has plumped for a more strait-forward delivery in some wristy brushwork but has found imagery that laps up the jungle and envelops it in a weird and wonderful colour cast as if the painter was working with a particularly odd photo filter. I could live without the glossy sheen over them that I’m imagining the artist sees as a way of giving them a further homogeneity but is very much not to my taste.

Philip Clarke is staying very much within a tradition of wee sized photo realism with scenes in oil on aluminium sheet. His lonely stretches of some of the loveliest parts of the highlands are powerful and affecting images and his handling is pretty decent too. Its quite a well worn route he’s taken but he does it well.

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left – Saku, Oil on canvas, 50 x 50 cm. 2018 Sarah Cunningham right – Elgol, Oil on aluminium, 20 x 15 cm. 2018 Philip Clarke

Sarah Cunningham can paint, in fact her handling is some of the most confident on show, but as yet some of the subjects and compositions are less than convincing. Steering clear of figuration might help and working into the image as it ‘lives’ on the canvas works better for her. Saku and Borneo struck me as a rather lovely pictures where what was pushed around its surface took precedence over the image portrayed.

Perhaps the whackiest and certainly most arresting work comes from Adam Waghorne, for whom it is the image that takes centre stage. These are played out on an array of differing supports and techniques and have about them a whiff of Wyndham Lewis’s self portrait of 1921 or Stanley Spencer mixed into psychedelica…in fact the parade of them across a glass support is one of the oddest and unusual works I’ve seen on a wall anywhere so far this year.

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Given that these are still younger artists, and forgiving the rather overblown claims for the show in the blurb, this was one that entertained and intrigued, if not wholly excited, anyone who cares about the future of the medium. The biggest hurdles they face today is the indifference of the curatorial elites, their non-metropolitan location and a buying public, the absence of which makes the UK for the most part an inhospitable place for serious painting now.

Sadly the show ended Saturday past…but there’s always something worth checking out at the Surface Gallery space at the bottom of Southwell Road in Nottingham.

 

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